Search

Rss Posts

Rss Comments

Login

 

IBM ‘TrueNorth’ Neuro-Synaptic Chip Promises Huge Changes — Eventually

Aug 19

JakartaDean writes: Each of IBM’s “TrueNorth” chips contains 5.4 billion transistors and runs on 70 milliwatts. The chips are designed to behave like neurons—the basic building blocks of biological brains. Dharmenda Modha, the head of IBM’s cognitive computing group, says a system of 24 connected chips simulates 48 million neurons, roughly the same number rodents have. Whereas conventional chips are wired to execute particular “instructions,” the TrueNorth juggles “spikes,” much simpler pieces of information analogous to the pulses of electricity in the brain. Spikes, for instance, can show the changes in someone’s voice as they speak—or changes in color from pixel to pixel in a photo. “You can think of it as a one-bit message sent from one neuron to another.” says one of the chip’s chief designers. The chips are designed well not for training neural networks, but for executing them. This has significant implications for consumer AI: big companies with lots of resources could focus on the training, which individual TrueNorth chips in people’s gadgets could handle the execution.


Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Comments are closed.