Search

Rss Posts

Rss Comments

Login

 

Posts from July, 2017

Vettel wins in Hungary as Ferrari finishes first and second

Jul 31

Filed under:
,,


Vettel’s lead in the 2017 championship stretches to 14 points.

Continue reading Vettel wins in Hungary as Ferrari finishes first and second

Vettel wins in Hungary as Ferrari finishes first and second originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 30 Jul 2017 14:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | 
Email this | 
Comments

View source

Ducati is not for sale according to VW supervisory board

Jul 31

Filed under:
,,,


“We don’t need money and our subsidiaries are not up for grabs by bargain hunters.”

Continue reading Ducati is not for sale according to VW supervisory board

Ducati is not for sale according to VW supervisory board originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 30 Jul 2017 13:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | 
Email this | 
Comments

View source

Luxembourg Just Passed A New Asteroid Mining Law

Jul 31

Remember when NASA visited an asteroid with $10 quintillion worth of minerals? Now the lucrative asteroid-mining industry is being pursued by “the European banking hub with a population not much bigger than Albuquerque’s,” reports Bloomberg, as low-cost reconnaissance missions are already looking “increasingly feasible.” An anonymous reader writes:

Last week Luxembourg’s parliament unanimously passed an asteroid mining law (which goes into effect Tuesday) “that gives companies ownership of what they extract from the celestial bodies…” according to Engadget. “Luxembourg’s law is pretty similar to the one President Obama signed back in 2015 in that it gives mining companies the right to keep their loot. Both of them also take advantage of a loophole in the UN’s Outer Space Treaty, which states that nations can’t claim and occupy the moon and other celestial bodies. They don’t give companies ownership of asteroids, after all, only the minerals they extract.. Unlike the U.S. version, though, a company’s major stakeholders don’t need to be based in Luxembourg to enjoy its protection — they only need to have an office in country.”

Bloomberg reports that the law “could serve as a model for other small countries hoping to explore asteroids — and to get a piece of the booming space business,” since the tiny country is also offering to buy equity stakes in any companies which relocate to Luxembourg. “Luxembourg’s success in attracting these companies should show other small countries that space isn’t just for superpowers any more… Competition has made space achievable for many more companies, and for the countries that support them.”
For the last few years Luxembourg has begun quietly investing in asteroid mining, including a joint venture with “Deep Space Industries” to build a spacecraft to test asteroid-mining technologies — while another collaboration with Kleos Space is working on “in-space manufacturing technology.”


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

A Robot At DEFCON Cracked A Safe Within 30 Minutes

Jul 31

schwit1 shared an article from the BBC:
Using a cheap robot, a team of hackers has cracked open a leading-brand combination safe, live on stage in Las Vegas. The team from SparkFun Electronics was able to open a SentrySafe safe in around 30 minutes… After the robot discovered the combination was 51.36.93, the safe popped open — to rapturous applause from the audience of several hundred… The robot, which cost around $200 to put together, makes use of 3D-printed parts that can be easily replaced to fit different brands of combination safe. It cannot crack a digital lock — although vulnerabilities in those systems have been exposed by other hacking teams in the past.

Though the safe had a million possible combinations using three two-digit numbers, the last number had slightly larger indents on the dial — reducing the possible combinations to just 10,000. And in addition, “the team also discovered that the safe’s design allows for a margin of error to compensate for humans getting their combination slightly wrong” — which meant that the robot only had to check every third number. “Using this method, they could cut down the number of possible combinations to around 1,000.”

“Some SentrySafe models come with an additional lock and key, but the team was able to unlock it by using a Bic pen.”


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

O’Reilly Media Asks: Is It Time To Build A New Internet?

Jul 31

An anonymous reader shares an article from O’Reilly Media’s VP of content strategy:
It’s high time to build the internet that we wanted all along: a network designed to respect privacy, a network designed to be secure, and a network designed to impose reasonable controls on behavior. And a network with few barriers to entry — in particular, the certainty of ISP extortion as new services pay to get into the “fast lane.” Is it time to start over from scratch, with new protocols that were designed with security, privacy, and maybe even accountability in mind? Is it time to pull the plug on the abusive old internet, with its entrenched monopolistic carriers, its pervasive advertising, and its spam? Could we start over again?
That would be painful, but not impossible… In his deliciously weird novel Someone Comes To Town, Someone Leaves Town, Cory Doctorow writes about an alternative network built from open WiFi access points. It sounds similar to Google’s Project Fi, but built and maintained by a hacker underground. Could Doctorow’s vision be our future backboneless backbone? A network of completely distributed municipal networks, with long haul segments over some public network, but with low-level protocols designed for security? We’d have to invent some new technology to build that new network, but that’s already started.
The article cites the increasing popularity of peer-to-peer functionality everywhere from Bitcoin and Blockchain to the Beaker browser, the Federated Wiki, and even proposals for new file-sharing protocols like IPFS and Upspin. “Can we build a network that can’t be monopolized by monopolists? Yes, we can…”

“It’s time to build the network we want, and not just curse the network we have.”


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

HackerRank Tries To Calculate Which US States Have The Best Developers

Jul 31

An anonymous reader writes:
Palo Alto-based HackerRank, which offers online programmng challenges, “dug into our data of about 450,000 unique U.S. developers to uncover which states are home to the best software engineers, and which pockets of the country have the highest rate of developer growth.” Examining the 24 months from 2015 through the end of 2016, they calculated the average score for each state in eight programming-related domains. (Algorithms, data structures, functional programming, math, Java, Ruby, C++, and Python.) But it seems like low-population states would have fewer people taking the tests, meaning a disproportionate number of motivated and knowledgeable test takers could drastically skew the results. Sure enough, Wyoming — with a population of just 584,153 — has the smallest population of any U.S. state, but the site’s second-highest average score, and the top score in three subject domains — Ruby, data structures, and algorithms. And the District of Columbia — population 681,170 — has the highest average score for functional programming.

California, New York and Virginia still had the highest number of developers using the site, while Alaska, Wyoming and South Dakota not surprisingly had the least number of developers. But maybe the real take-away is that programmers are now becoming more distributed. HackerRank’s announcement notes that the site “found growing developer communities and skilled developers all across the country. Previously, the highest concentrations of developers did not stray far from the tech hubs in California. Hawaii, Colorado, Virginia, and Nevada demonstrated the fastest growth in terms of developer activity on the HackerRank platform…” In addition, “we’ve had a noticeable uptick in customers across industries, from healthcare to retail and finance, with strong demand for identifying technical skills quickly.”

Their conclucion? “Today, as the demand for developers goes beyond technology and as there is more opportunity to work remotely, there’s a more distributed workforce of skilled developers across the nation, from the Rust Belt to the East Coast… Software developers aren’t just attached to VCs, startups or Silicon Valley anymore.”


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

It Will Take Fedora More Releases To Switch Off Python 2

Jul 31

An anonymous reader quotes Phoronix:
Finalizing Fedora’s switch from Python 2 to Python 3 by default is still going to take several more Fedora release cycles and should be done by the 2020 date when Python 2 will be killed off upstream. While much of Fedora’s Python code is now compatible with Py3, the /usr/bin/python still points to Python 2, various python-* packages still mean Python 2… The end game is to eventually get rid of Python 2 from Fedora but that is even further out.

Fedora is now gathering feedback on a Wiki page explaining the switch.


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Petition Asks Adobe To Open-Source Flash To Preserve Internet History

Jul 31

An anonymous reader quotes BleepingComputer:
A petition is asking Adobe to release Flash into the hands of the open-source community. Finnish developer Juha Lindstedt started the petition a day after Adobe announced plans to end Flash support by the end of 2020. “Flash is an important piece of Internet history and killing Flash means future generations can’t access the past,” Lindstedt explains in the petition’s opening paragraph. “Games, experiments and websites would be forgotten.” The developer wants Adobe to open-source Flash or parts of its technology so the open-source community could take on the job of supporting a minimal version of the Flash plugin or at least create a tool to accurately convert old SWF and FLA files to modern HTML5, canvas data, or WebAssembly code… Lindstedt is asking users to sign the petition by starring the project on GitHub. At the time of writing, the petition has garnered over 3,000 stars.
A reporter at ZDNet counters that “the only way to really secure Flash is to get rid of it… If Flash lives, people will continue to use it, and without security support, it will be even more insecure than ever.”
He points out there’s already several programs that convert Flash into other formats — and that Adobe already open sourced its Flex framework for building Flash applications back in 2008 (now supported by the Apache Software Foundation as Apache Flex). “In other words, we don’t need the Flash source code to convert or create Flash files. Just let Flash go already…!

“Usually, I’m favor with open-sourcing everything and anything. Not this time. Flash has proven to be a net of endless security holes. It’s time to let it go for once and for all.


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Should The Government Fix Slow Internet Access?

Jul 31

An anonymous reader quotes a story from Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight site about “the worst internet in America”:
FiveThirtyEight analyzed every county’s broadband usage using data from researchers at the University of Iowa and Arizona State University and found that Saguache, Colorado was at the bottom. Only 5.6 percent of adults were estimated to have broadband… It has some of the worst internet in the country. That’s in part because of the mountains and the isolation they bring… Its population of 6,300 is spread across 3,169 square miles 7,800 feet above sea level, but on land that is mostly flat, so you can almost see the full scope of two mountain ranges as you drive the county’s highway…
But Saguache isn’t alone in lacking broadband. According to the Federal Communications Commission, 39 percent of rural Americans — 23 million people — don’t have access. In Pew surveys, those who live in rural areas were about twice as likely not to use the internet as urban or suburban Americans.

In Saguache County download speeds of 12 Mbps (with an upload speed of 2 Mbps) cost $90 a month, and the article points out that when it comes to providing broadband, “small companies and cooperatives are going it more or less alone, without much help yet from the federal government.” But that raises an inevitable question. Should the federal government be subsidizing rural internet access?


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Microbe New To Science Found In Self-Fermented Beer

Jul 31

sciencehabit writes: In May 2014, a group of scientists took a field trip to a small brewery in an old warehouse in Seattle, Washington — and came away with a microbe scientists have never seen before. In so-called wild beer, the team identified a yeast belonging to the genus Pichia, which turned out to be a hybrid of a known species called P. membranifaciens and another Pichia species completely new to science. Other Pichia species are known to spoil a beer, but the new hybrid seems to smell better.

Their investigation offered a proof-of-concept for a new methodology for studying spontaneously fermented beers — especially since the brewmaster admitted that like many brewers making wild beers, “he had no idea what microbes were living in the barrel staves that had inoculated his beer.”
The scientists dubbed the new hybrid Pichia apotheca — which is Greek for “warehouse.”


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source