Search

Rss Posts

Rss Comments

Login

 

2016 Audi A4 is larger, lighter [w/video]

Jul 01

Filed under: , , ,

The 2016 Audi A4 is here, and it’s everything you expect: larger, lighter, more powerful, more efficient, and packed with all the latest technology.

Continue reading 2016 Audi A4 is larger, lighter [w/video]

2016 Audi A4 is larger, lighter [w/video] originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 28 Jun 2015 22:38:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments

View source

UK’s National Computer Museum Looks For Help Repairing BBC Micros

Jul 01

tresho writes: 1981-era 8-bit BBC Micro computers and peripherals are displayed in a special interactive exhibit at the UK’s National Museum of Computing designed to give modern students a taste of programming a vintage machine. Now, the museum is asking for help maintaining them. “We want to find out whether people have got skills out there that can keep the cluster alive as long as we can,” said Chris Monk, learning coordinator at the organization. “Owen Grover, a volunteer at the museum who currently helps maintain the cluster of BBC Micro machines, said they held up well despite being more than 30 years old. The BBC Micro was ‘pretty robust,’ he said, because it was designed to be used in classrooms. This meant that refurbishing machines for use in the hands-on exhibit was usually fairly straightforward. ‘The main problem we need to sort out is the power supply,’ he said. ‘There are two capacitors that dry out and if we do not replace them they tend to explode and stink the place out. So we change them as a matter of course.’”


Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Surveillance Court: NSA Can Resume Bulk Surveillance

Jul 01

An anonymous reader writes: We all celebrated back in May when a federal court ruled the NSA’s phone surveillance illegal, and again at the beginning of June, when the Patriot Act expired, ending authorization for that surveillance. Unfortunately, the NY Times now reports on a ruling from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which concluded that the NSA may temporarily resume bulk collection of metadata about U.S. citizens’s phone calls. From the article: “In a 26-page opinion (PDF) made public on Tuesday, Judge Michael W. Mosman of the surveillance court rejected the challenge by FreedomWorks, which was represented by a former Virginia attorney general, Ken Cuccinelli, a Republican. And Judge Mosman said that the Second Circuit was wrong, too. ‘Second Circuit rulings are not binding’ on the surveillance court, he wrote, ‘and this court respectfully disagrees with that court’s analysis, especially in view of the intervening enactment of the U.S.A. Freedom Act.’ When the Second Circuit issued its ruling that the program was illegal, it did not issue any injunction ordering the program halted, saying that it would be prudent to see what Congress did as Section 215 neared its June 1 expiration.”


Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Is Safari the New Internet Explorer?

Jul 01

An anonymous reader writes: Software developer Nolan Lawson says Apple’s Safari has taken the place of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer as the major browser that lags behind all the others. This comes shortly after the Edge Conference, where major players in web technologies got together to discuss the state of the industry and what’s ahead. Lawson says Mozilla, Google, Opera, and Microsoft were all in attendance and willing to talk — but not Apple. “It’s hard to get insight into why Apple is behaving this way. They never send anyone to web conferences, their Surfin’ Safari blog is a shadow of its former self, and nobody knows what the next version of Safari will contain until that year’s WWDC. In a sense, Apple is like Santa Claus, descending yearly to give us some much-anticipated presents, with no forewarning about which of our wishes he’ll grant this year. And frankly, the presents have been getting smaller and smaller lately.” He argues, “At this point, we in the web community need to come to terms with the fact that Safari has become the new IE. Microsoft is repentant these days, Google is pushing the web as far as it can go, and Mozilla is still being Mozilla. Apple is really the one singer in that barbershop quartet hitting all the sour notes, and it’s time we start talking about it openly instead of tiptoeing around it like we’re going to hurt somebody’s feelings.”


Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Quebec Government May Force ISPs To Block Gambling Websites

Jul 01

New submitter ottawan- writes: In order to drive more customers to their own online gambling website, the Quebec government and Loto-Quebec (the provincial organization in charge of gaming and lotteries) are thinking about forcing the province’s ISPs to block all other online gambling websites. The list of websites to be blocked will be maintained by Loto-Quebec, and the government believes that the blocking will increase government revenue by up to $27 million (CAD) per year.


Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Celebrating Workarounds, Kludges, and Hacks

Jul 01

itwbennett writes: We all have some favorite workarounds that right a perceived wrong (like getting around the Wall Street Journal paywall) or make something work the way we think it ought to. From turning off annoying features in your Prius to getting around sanctions in Crimea and convincing your Android phone you’re somewhere you’re not, workarounds are a point of pride, showing off our ingenuity and resourcefulness. And sometimes artful workarounds can even keep businesses operating in times of crisis. Take, for example, the Sony employees, who, in the wake of the Great Hack of 2014 when the company’s servers went down, dug out old company BlackBerrys that, while they had been abandoned, had never had their plans deactivated. Because BlackBerrys used RIM’s email servers instead of Sony’s, they could still communicate with one another, and employees with BlackBerrys became the company’s lifeline as it slowly put itself back together.
What hacks and workarounds keep your life sane?


Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Apple Loses Ebook Price Fixing Appeal, Must Pay $450 Million

Jul 01

An anonymous reader writes: A federal appeals court ruled 2-1 today that Apple indeed conspired with publishers to increase ebook prices. The ruling puts Apple on the hook for the $450 million settlement reached in 2014 with lawyers and attorneys general from 33 states. The Justice Dept. contended that the price-fixing conspiracy raised the price of some e-books from the $10 standard set by Amazon to $13-$15. The one dissenting judge argued that Apple’s efforts weren’t anti-competitive because Amazon held 90% of the market at the time. Apple is unhappy with the ruling, but they haven’t announced plans to take the case further. They said, “While we want to put this behind us, the case is about principles and values. We know we did nothing wrong back in 2010 and are assessing next steps.”


Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Stanford Starts the ‘Secure Internet of Things Project’

Jul 01

An anonymous reader writes: The internet-of-things is here to stay. Lots of people now have smart lights, smart thermostats, smart appliances, smart fire detectors, and other internet-connect gadgets installed in their houses. The security of those devices has been an obvious and predictable problem since day one. Manufacturers can’t be bothered to provide updates to $500 smartphones more than a couple years after they’re released; how long do you think they’ll be worried about security updates for a $50 thermostat? Security researchers have been vocal about this, and they’ve found lots of vulnerabilities and exploits before hackers have had a chance to. But the manufacturers have responded in the wrong way. Instead of developing a more robust approach to device security, they’ve simply thrown encryption at everything. This makes it temporarily harder for malicious hackers to have their way with the devices, but also shuts out consumers and white-hat researchers from knowing what the devices are doing. Stanford, Berkeley, and the University of Michigan have now started the Secure Internet of Things Project, which aims to promote security and transparency for IoT devices. They hope to unite regulators, researchers, and manufacturers to ensure nascent internet-connected tech is developed in a way that respects customer privacy and choice.


Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Cory Doctorow Talks About Fighting the DMCA (2 Videos)

Jul 01

Wikipedia says, ‘Cory Efram Doctorow (/kri dktro/; born July 17, 1971) is a Canadian-British blogger, journalist, and science fiction author who serves as co-editor of the blog Boing Boing. He is an activist in favour of liberalising copyright laws and a proponent of the Creative Commons organization, using some of their licenses for his books. Some common themes of his work include digital rights management, file sharing, and post-scarcity economics.’ Timothy Lord sat down with Cory at the O’Reilly Solid Conference and asked him about the DMCA and how the fight against it is going. Due to management-imposed restraints on video lengths, we broke the ~10 minute interview into two parts, both attached to this paragraph. The transcript covers both videos, so it’s your choice: view, read or listen to as much of this interview as you like.


Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

White House Lures Mudge From Google To Launch Cyber UL

Jul 01

chicksdaddy writes: The Obama Whitehouse has tapped famed hacker Peiter Zatko (aka “Mudge”) to head up a new project aimed at developing an “underwriters’ lab” for cyber security. The new organization would function as an independent, non-profit entity designed to assess the security strengths and weaknesses of products and publishing the results of its tests. Zatko is a famed hacker and security luminary, who cut his teeth with the Boston-based hacker collective The L0pht in the 1990s before moving on to work in private industry and, then, to become a program manager at the DARPA in 2010. Though known for keeping a low profile, his scruffy visage (circa 1998) graced the pages of the Washington Post in a recent piece that remembered testimony that Mudge and other L0pht members gave to Congress about the dangers posed by insecure software.


Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source