Search

Rss Posts

Rss Comments

Login

 

Sunday Drive: Subaru Ascends up to the hottest market segment in America

Feb 19

Filed under:
,,,,,,,,,,


From crossovers to sportscars … and the contents of a long-forgotten storage unit.

Continue reading Sunday Drive: Subaru Ascends up to the hottest market segment in America

Sunday Drive: Subaru Ascends up to the hottest market segment in America originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 18 Feb 2018 18:20:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | 
Email this | 
Comments

View source

2019 Hyundai Santa Fe shows off in four video teasers

Feb 19

Filed under:
,,,,,,,


There’s some interesting lighting technology baked in the new Santa Fe.

Continue reading 2019 Hyundai Santa Fe shows off in four video teasers

2019 Hyundai Santa Fe shows off in four video teasers originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 18 Feb 2018 12:15:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | 
Email this | 
Comments

View source

Mercedes diesels may have had illegal diesel emissions software in the U.S.

Feb 19

Filed under:
,,,,


“The documents available to Bild have obviously selectively been released in order to harm Daimler and its 290,000 employees,” said a spokesperson for Daimler.

Continue reading Mercedes diesels may have had illegal diesel emissions software in the U.S.

Mercedes diesels may have had illegal diesel emissions software in the U.S. originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 18 Feb 2018 11:50:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | 
Email this | 
Comments

View source

BMW begins technician training for Marines at Camp Pendleton

Feb 19

Filed under:
,


After the Marines graduate from the program, BMW will help them find work at its dealerships.

Continue reading BMW begins technician training for Marines at Camp Pendleton

BMW begins technician training for Marines at Camp Pendleton originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 18 Feb 2018 11:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | 
Email this | 
Comments

View source

Porsche motorsport exec refutes rumors of turbo, PDK-only GT3

Feb 19

Filed under:
,,,,,


Next question: How long is “as long as we can”?

Continue reading Porsche motorsport exec refutes rumors of turbo, PDK-only GT3

Porsche motorsport exec refutes rumors of turbo, PDK-only GT3 originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 18 Feb 2018 09:01:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | 
Email this | 
Comments

View source

Google Trains AI To Write Wikipedia Articles

Feb 19

The Register: A team within Google Brain — the web giant’s crack machine-learning research lab — has taught software to generate Wikipedia-style articles by summarizing information on web pages… to varying degrees of success. As we all know, the internet is a never ending pile of articles, social media posts, memes, joy, hate, and blogs. It’s impossible to read and keep up with everything. Using AI to tell pictures of dogs and cats apart is cute and all, but if such computers could condense information down into useful snippets, that would be really be handy. It’s not easy, though. A paper, out last month and just accepted for this year’s International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR) in April, describes just how difficult text summarization really is. A few companies have had a crack at it. Salesforce trained a recurrent neural network with reinforcement learning to take information and retell it in a nutshell, and the results weren’t bad.


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Sweden Considers Six Years in Jail For Online Pirates

Feb 19

Sweden’s Minister for Justice has received recommendations as to how the country should punish online pirates. From a report: Helene Fritzon received a proposal which would create crimes of gross infringement under both copyright and trademark law, leading to sentences of up to six years in prison. The changes would also ensure that non-physical property, such as domain names, can be seized.


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

The Wikipedia Zero Program Will End This Year

Feb 19

Wikimedia: Wikimedia 2030, the global discussion to define the future of the Wikimedia movement, created a bold vision for the future of Wikimedia and the role we want to play in the world as a movement. With this shared vision for our movement’s future in mind, the Wikimedia Foundation is evolving how we work with partners to address some of the critical barriers to participating in free knowledge globally. After careful evaluation, the Wikimedia Foundation has decided to discontinue one of its partnership approaches, the Wikipedia Zero program. Wikipedia Zero was created in 2012 to address one barrier to participating in Wikipedia globally: high mobile data costs. Through the program, we partnered with mobile operators to waive mobile data fees for their customers to freely access Wikipedia on mobile devices. Over the course of this year, no additional Wikipedia Zero partnerships will be formed, and the remaining partnerships with mobile operators will expire. In the program’s six year tenure, we have partnered with 97 mobile carriers in 72 countries to provide access to Wikipedia to more than 800 million people free of mobile data charges. Further reading: Medium.


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

Occupational Licensing Blunts Competition and Boosts Inequality

Feb 19

Occupational licensing — the practice of regulating who can do what jobs — has been on the rise for decades. In 1950 one in 20 employed Americans required a licence to work. By 2017 that had risen to more than one in five. From a report: The trend partly reflects an economic shift towards service industries, in which licences are more common. But it has also been driven by a growing number of professions successfully lobbying state governments to make it harder to enter their industries. Most studies find that licensing requirements raise wages in a profession by around 10%, probably by making it harder for competitors to set up shop. Lobbyists justify licences by claiming consumers need protection from unqualified providers. In many cases this is obviously a charade. Forty-one states license makeup artists, as if wielding concealer requires government oversight. Thirteen license bartending; in nine, those who wish to pull pints must first pass an exam. Such examples are popular among critics of licensing, because the threat from unlicensed staff in low-skilled jobs seems paltry. Yet they are not representative of the broader harm done by licensing, which affects crowds of more highly educated workers like Ms Varnam. Among those with only a high-school education, 13% are licensed. The figure for those with postgraduate degrees is 45%. […] One way of telling that many licences are superfluous is the sheer variance in the law across states. About 1,100 occupations are regulated in at least one state, but fewer than 60 are regulated in all 50, according to a report from 2015 by Barack Obama’s White House. Yet a handful of high-earning professions are regulated everywhere. In particular, licences are more common in legal and health-care occupations than in any other.


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source

‘Microsoft Should Scrap Bing and Call it Microsoft Search’

Feb 19

Chris Matyszczyk, writing for CNET: Does anyone really have a deep, abiding respect for the Bing brand? Somehow, if ever I’ve heard the brand name being used, it seems to be in the context of a joke. That doesn’t mean the service itself is to be derided. It does suggest, though, that the brand name doesn’t incite passion or excesses of reverence. The Microsoft brand, on the other hand, has become much stronger under Satya Nadella’s stewardship. It’s gained respect. Especially when the company showed off its Surface Studio in 2016 and made Apple’s offerings look decidedly bland. Where once Microsoft was a joke in an Apple ad, now it’s a symbol of a resurgent company that’s trying new things and sometimes even succeeding. The funny thing about Bing is that it’s not an unsuccessful product — at least not as unsuccessful as some might imagine. Last year, Redmond said it has a 9 percent worldwide search market share, enjoying a 25 percent share in the UK, 18 percent in France and 17 percent in Canada. And look at the US. Microsoft says it has a 33 percent share here. Wouldn’t it be reasonable to think that going all the way with Microsoft branding and letting Bing drift into the retirement home for funny names might be a positive move?


Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

View source