Search

Rss Posts

Rss Comments

Login

 

Russia May Be Planning National Space Station To Replace ISS

Nov 22

An anonymous reader writes with news that Russia may be building its own space station to replace the ISS. Russia may be planning to build a new, independent national space station rather than prolong its participation in the $150 billion International Space Station (ISS) program beyond its current 2020 end date. The U.S. space agency NASA proposed last year to extend the life of the ISS — the largest international project ever undertaken by nations during peacetime — beyond its currently scheduled 2020 end date to at least 2024.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



View source

The Man Who Made Tetris

Nov 22

rossgneumann writes Life gets pretty chill after creating ‘Tetris’ and escaping the KGB. A quick web search for “Alexey Pajitnov” brings up pages of articles and interviews that fixate only on his seminal creation—a work that remains, far and away, the best selling video game of all time. But clearly, there’s more to the man than just Tetris. Meeting Pajitnov himself led me to wonder about, well, everything else. What was the Tetris-less life of Alexey Pajitnov?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



View source

Greenwald Advises Market-Based Solution To Mass Surveillance

Nov 22

Nicola Hahn writes In his latest Intercept piece Glenn Greenwald considers the recent defeat of the Senate’s USA Freedom Act. He remarks that governments “don’t walk around trying to figure out how to limit their own power.” Instead of appealing to an allegedly irrelevant Congress Greenwald advocates utilizing the power of consumer demand to address the failings of cyber security. Specifically he argues that companies care about their bottom line and that the trend of customers refusing to tolerate insecure products will force companies to protect user privacy, implement encryption, etc. All told Greenwald’s argument is very telling: that society can rely on corporate interests for protection. Is it true that representative government is a lost cause and that lawmakers would never knowingly yield authority? There are people who think that advising citizens to devolve into consumers is a dubious proposition.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



View source

Harvard Students Move Fossil Fuel Stock Fight To Court

Nov 22

mdsolar writes A group of Harvard students, frustrated by the university’s refusal to shed fossil fuel stocks from its investment portfolios, is looking beyond protests and resolutions to a new form of pressure: the courts. The seven law students and undergraduates filed a lawsuit on Wednesday in Suffolk County Superior Court in Massachusetts against the president and fellows of Harvard College, among others, for what they call “mismanagement of charitable funds.” The 11-page complaint, with 167 pages of supporting exhibits, asks the court to compel divestment on behalf of the students and “future generations.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



View source

The Nintendo DS Turns 10

Nov 22

An anonymous reader writes The Nintendo DS has reached a remarkable milestone: it’s turned 10 years old. A new retrospective on one of Nintendo’s greatest ever smash hits points out that it’s now old enough to become a Pokemon trainer, and looks back at some of the greatest (and possibly overlooked) titles on the platform which has sold 154 million copies in a decade.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



View source

Ask Slashdot: Workaday Software For BSD On the Desktop?

Nov 21

An anonymous reader writes So for a variety of reasons (some related to recent events, some ongoing for a while) I’ve kinda soured on Linux and have been looking at giving BSD a shot on the desktop. I’ve been a Gentoo user for many years and am reasonably comfortable diving into stuff, so I don’t anticipate user friendliness being a show stopper. I suspect it’s more likely something I currently do will have poor support in the BSD world. I have of course been doing some reading and will probably just give it a try at some point regardless, but I was curious what experience and advice other slashdot users could share. There’s been many bold comments on slashdot about moving away from Linux, so I suspect I’m not the only one asking these questions. Use-case wise, my list of must haves is: Minecraft, and probably more dubiously, FTB; mplayer or equivalent (very much prefer mplayer as it’s what I’ve used forever); VirtualBox or something equivalent; Firefox (like mplayer, it’s just what I’ve always used, and while I would consider alternatives, that would definitely be a negative); Flash (I hate it, but browsing the web sans-flash is still a pain); OpenRA (this is the one I anticipate giving me the most trouble, but playing it is somewhat of an obsession). Stuff that would be nice but I can live without: Full disk encryption; Openbox / XFCE (It’s what I use now and would like to keep using, but I could probably switch to something else without too much grief); jackd/rakarrack or something equivalent (currently use my computer as a cheap guitar amp/effects stack); Qt (toolkit of choice for my own stuff). What’s the most painless way to transition to BSD for this constellation of uses, and which variety of BSD would you suggest?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



View source

Apple Swaps "Get" Button For "Free" To Avoid Confusion Over In-App Purchases

Nov 21

New submitter lazarus (2879) writes Apple is falling in line with the European Commission’s request that app sellers do more to stop inadvertent in-app purchases. Following Google’s lead, Cupertino has removed all instances of the word “free” within its iOS and Mac app stores (with the exception of its own apps, like iMovie), and replaced them with the term “Get.” The new label clarifies what users can expect when downloading an app. Apps previously labeled as “Free” will now have a “Get” label. If those apps include in-app purchases, a small gray “In-App Purchase” label will appear below the “Get” button.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



View source

CMI Director Alex King Talks About Rare Earth Supplies (Video 2)

Nov 21

Yesterday we ran video #1 of 2 about the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) at the Iowa State Ames Laboratory in Ames, Iowa. They have partners from other national laboratories, universities, and industry, too. Obviously there is more than enough information on this subject that Dr. King can easily fill two 15-minute videos, not to mention so many Google links that instead of trying to list all of them, we’re giving you one link to Google using the search term “rare earths.” Yes, we know Rare Earth would be a great name for a rock band. But the mineral rare earths are important in the manufacture of items ranging from strong magnets to touch screens and rechargeable batteries, so please watch the video(s) or at least read the transcript(s). (Alternate Video Link)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



View source

Interviews: Ask Adora Svitak About Education and Women In STEM and Politics

Nov 21

samzenpus writes Adora Svitak is a child prodigy, author and activist. She taught her first class on writing at a local elementary school when she was 7, the same year her book, Flying Fingers was published. In 2010, Adora spoke at a TED Conference. Her speech, “What Adults Can Learn from Kids”, has been viewed over 3.7 million times and has been translated into over 40 different languages. She is an advocate for literacy, youth empowerment, and for the inclusion of more women and girls in STEM and politics. 17 this year, she served as a Youth Advisor to the USA Science and Engineering Festival in Washington, DC. and is a freshman at UC Berkeley. Adora has agreed to take some time from her books and answer any questions you may have. As usual, ask as many as you’d like, but please, one per post.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



View source

As Amazon Grows In Seattle, Pay Equity For Women Declines

Nov 21

reifman writes Amazon’s hiring so quickly in Seattle that it’s on pace to employ 45,000 people or seven percent of the city. But, 75% of these hires are male. While Seattle women earned 86 cents per dollar earned by men in 2012, today, they make only 78 cents per dollar. In “Amageddon: Seattle’s Increasingly Obvious Future”, I review these and other surprising facts about Amazon’s growing impact on the city: we’re the fastest growing — now larger than Boston, we have the fastest rising rents, the fourth worst traffic, we’re only twelfth in public transit, we’re the fifth whitest and getting whiter, we’re experiencing record levels of property crime and the amount of office space under construction has nearly doubled to 3.2 million square feet in the past year.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



View source